TITLE V ABSTINENCE EDUCATION

FREQUENT QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS (FAQs)

Title V Abstinence Education Grant Program (AEGP)

  1. What is the Title V Abstinence Education Grant Program (AEGP)

    The Title V Abstinence Education Grant Program (AEGP) is a federally funded program that provides States and U.S. Territories with grant funding to develop, implement and evaluate abstinence-based education. In addition to classroom instruction, AEGP implementation may include mentoring, counseling and adult supervision when appropriate. Federal guidelines encourage awarded States to focus on youth who are most likely to bear children out of wedlock, which include but is not limited to youth, ages 10 to 19, who are homeless, in foster care, residing in rural areas or geographic areas that have high teen birth rates.

    The Department of Public Instruction is responsible for the implementation of the Title V Abstinence Education Grant Program (AEGP) for the state of North Carolina.

  2. Who is the funding source for AEGP?

    The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB), which is housed under the United States Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS), is responsible for governing the federal Title V Abstinence Education Grant Program (AEGP). The following URL address provides a direct link to Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) webpage: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/fysb/programs/adolescent-pregnancy-prevention.

  3. How are AEGP funds used at the state level?

    An average of $2M in Title V AEGP funds are award to the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) annually.

    The Title V Abstinence Education Grant allows North Carolina to provide abstinence education consistent with the state statute and the Healthful Living Essential Standards. The program focuses on students between the ages of 10 to 14 in grades 5 through 6 with special attention to those at increased risk for bearing children out of wedlock, academic failure and/or out of home placement. The attention to youth in or aging out of foster care reflects the language that was in the federal Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) released by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration on Children and Families.

    The strategy employed is to provide education, services, and support to North Carolina youth that supports their decision to abstain from sexual activity by providing opportunities that align with the Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child Model (WSCC).

  4. Does AEGP conflict with information that is to be taught under House Bill 88 (Reproductive Health and Safety Education - RHSE)?

    No. House Bill 88, also known as Reproductive Health and Safety Education, is written to support what is to be taught in NC schools in grades 7, 8 and high school. The Title V AEGP State Plan is written to support the provision of health education and other abstinence-based services for students in grades 5 and 6.

  5. Who is eligible to receive funds disseminated at the state level?

    The Title V AGEP State Plan for North Carolina outlined a strategy to intensely target and provide funding to 33 out of the 115 local education agencies (LEAs) in the state. A list prioritized LEAs based on high teen pregnancy and birth rates, high rates of children aged 0-17 in foster care, high free and reduced lunch eligibility and academic risk factors (e.g. poor attendance and low graduation rates). The State Plan decided to focus on students aged 10 to 14 in grades 5 and 6 enrolled in the following public school districts: Allegheny County Schools, Anson County Schools, Ashe County Schools, Bertie County Schools, Bladen County Schools, Caldwell County Schools, Cumberland County Schools, Duplin County Schools, Edenton/Chowan County Schools, Edgecombe County Schools, Granville County Schools, Greene County Schools, Halifax County Schools, Hertford County Schools, Hoke County Schools, Jones County Schools, Lee County Schools, Lenoir County Schools, Martin County Schools, Montgomery County Schools, Northampton County Schools, Randolph County Schools, Asheboro City Schools, Robeson County Schools, Rockingham County Schools, Sampson County Schools, Scotland County Schools, Swain County Schools, Vance County Schools, Warren County Schools, Washington County Schools, Wayne County Schools, and Wilson County Schools.

  6. How do eligible LEAs apply for funding?

    LEAs were prioritized based on high teen pregnancy and birth rates, high rates of children aged 0-17 in foster care, high free and reduced lunch eligibility and academic risk factors (e.g. poor attendance and low graduation rates). Once identified, LEAs were notified of their eligibility. No other LEAs are eligible for funding at this time.

  7. Can other agencies or organizations apply to receive Title V AEGP funding through DPI?

    No. Other agencies or organizations cannot apply for Title V AEGP funds awarded to NCDPI. Grant funds are for the sole use of providing state aid to identified LEAs and implementing additional Title V grant efforts across the state.